Tag Archives: lettuce

Slow down melons! Speed up cabbage!

We’ve switched from trying to figure out what’s eating our crops to trying to determine when we can eat them. This is not as easy as it might seem.

It’s easy to know when to pick and eat tomatoes and cucumbers and kale, but melons and potatoes are a challenge. Andy has been researching how to tell when melons are ripe. He found a whole list of signs to look for, including raised ridges running from end to end, dead tendrils opposite the fruit, yellow coloring underneath and a tough rind. I simply knock on them, but they all sound hollow to me. We picked and ate one watermelon, but it was definitely not ready. This is good news. We’d rather everything waits until the end of September to ripen.

The potatoes are a challenge because our Yukon Gold plants have completely died off and the Russets aren’t far behind. Right now we’re leaving the potatoes in the ground because we don’t have a dark, 40-degree space where we can store them (we so look forward to having a root cellar some day). We’ll keep checking on the potatoes to see if they are doing okay in the ground.

We planted our short season crops recently – lettuce, peas and hakurei salad turnips – which we hope will be ready just in time for the wedding. Since it’s been dry, we’ve been watering these new seedlings every few days.

Our wedding website has a countdown on it. Every time I look at it, I’m surprised by how soon we’re getting married. I am so incredibly thrilled to marry Andy. We’re writing our own vows, and I’ve been thinking a lot about what I’m going to say. I often sit back and realize that I’m more in love with him than ever before, and each time I don’t think it possible to fall even deeper in love.

With the excitement, though, comes stress. It’s a lot of work to plan a wedding. We’ve spread out the planning over time, and we’ve delegated some tasks, but I still feel overwhelmed sometimes. Andy’s good at convincing me that everything will work out fine in the end. Also, I’m very aware of the fact that the point is to enjoy the wedding, including the planning (as much as possible). I try not to stress out too much.

Planning the wedding has been a process of discarding preconceptions of what a wedding “should” be like. In the beginning I thought we needed to hire a caterer. I thought we needed to rent nice dishes. I thought we should send out paper invitations and give everyone a wedding favor.

As we’ve planned the wedding, though, we’ve discarded traditions that we don’t see a purpose for. We decided that, with our friends and family, we can cook the wedding dinner. We don’t have to follow fancy recipes that take hours to complete. Fresh ingredients speak for themselves.

Each step of the way we’ve assessed what’s really important. Making a budget helped us prioritize and throw away the idea of renting dishes and sending invitations. Instead, we’ll use the plastic summer camp dishes and we emailed an invitation I made in Publisher.

We’ve focused in on what’s really important to us, which is spending time with people we care about and being intimately involved in our wedding dinner, from seed to plate.

P.S. Sorry I haven’t posted photos lately. My camera died after falling in the Saco River during my bachelorette party. But Sarah Moore is being kind enough to take photos of us and the garden a couple of times this summer, so maybe I’ll post some of her photos.

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Wishing for rain

It’s been a beautiful, sunny, summery weekend. Spring has been mild this year, and we’re tempted to plant many crops now. We have to remind ourselves that the schedule we made is meant to provide food for our September 25 wedding. We’re not looking for early crops. We’re also waiting for the electric fence to go up around our garden, which will probably happen in the first week or two of June. Lastly, we’re very aware of how dry the garden is right now, and we don’t have running water there yet. We would have to haul water from our house, which is around a half mile away. This is not an easy thing to do, especially since we don’t have a truck, yet.

So we’re trying to put off planting some crops, and we’re hoping for rain on the seeds we’ve put in the ground. Yesterday we planted Baby Pam pumpkins (good for pie) and two kinds of squash: Waltham Butternut and Hubbard Blue Ballet. We also planted some dill (for making pickles) and some lettuce for us to eat this summer.

We also laid black plastic on two beds. This plastic mulch warms the soil and keeps the weeds down. We will transplant heat-loving plants into holes in the black plastic, such as melons, cucumbers, tomatoes and peppers.

We were happy to see that our dwarf white clover has germinated in the paths. We planted this short variety of clover in the paths to keep the weeds down and add nitrogen to the soil.

Tomato and brassica seedlings in the cold frame

Back in our homemade cold frame, many plants are growing well. Our scavenged tomato seedlings are doing well in their bigger pots, cucumbers are huge and peppers are finally sprouting their true leaves.

Unfortunately, some tomato seedlings are still quite stunted, but we have enough others that we might not have to use them. Our kale and broccoli seedlings are getting too big for their trays, but we don’t want to transplant them before the fence goes up. Being near the woods, our garden would provide an easy meal for deer. April 27 may have been too early to start these seeds.

Our seedling room is a warm, humid sanctuary filled with tomatoes, peppers, basil, dill and melons (which are starting to germinate). I love to sit among the plants and read or do yoga.